Tag Archives: sunday read

Sunday Read: And That was in Michigan???

Today’s suggested read comes from Stuart Pigott. I might have mentioned him before, he is an English wine writer and critic who has done huge things for German Riesling, on the producer side as well as the consumer side, over the last 20 years or so. His book “Wein spricht Deutsch” (Wine speaks German) although published in 2007 is still one of the bible’s of German wine making and the culture behind it. I once took part in a tasting of Stuart’s, back in the late 1990s in Trier, and he was as fun as he came across as eccentric…

Stuart is on a Riesling mission, and it is good to see him publish in English these days, because Riesling can take any help it can get. He is currently traveling the United States, promoting German Riesling but also trying American Rieslings. On his tour, he stopped in Michigan, and boy was he surprised by the quality! I have to agree. What I have tasted so far from up North (it is quite a bit from Ann Arbor) has been pretty good. But read for yourself…

Yay, Michigan!! And happy Sunday!

Stuart Pigott: On the Riesling Road Day 3 – And that was in Michigan???

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Sunday Read: Germany’s Rieslings on the Tip of the Tongue

Eric Asimov of the New York Times has done it again: He has written about Riesling. One of the reasons why I like his writing so much is that he has for a long time been a supporter of appreciating Riesling more.

In this piece, he makes some valid points about the discrepancy between German Riesling drinkers, who overwhelmingly prefer their Rieslings dry, and international Riesling drinkers who rather have significant residual sugar in them. As he seems to point out, there is a room for both. While he loves the sweet style, he also thinks it is time to embrace the dry style. And sees a future for both styles, which I agree with.

In my book, that is one of the reasons why Riesling is the greatest wine grape around: It is so versatile, and can be made to excellent wines in so many different ways that it is mind boggling…

Here are some quotes (which naturally made my heart swell):

“The sweet style is thoroughly distinctive. Residual sugar is beautifully balanced by snappy acidity, making for a wine that is refreshing, even bracing, rather than cloying. No rieslings anywhere in the world are like these.”

“In these dry wines, without the residual sweetness to create tension with the acidity, the balance must come instead from a wine’s body and texture, which include the components of alcohol and fruit. If captured properly, the wines feel full of energy, as if they are thrusting forward toward the next sip. If not, they feel flat and dull. ”

Well worth your time.

Happy Sunday!

Eric Asimov: Germany’s Rieslings on the Tip of the Tongue

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Sunday Read: My Summer blogging series has come to an end…

My dear readers, Nina and I returned safely to A2, just in time for the opening game of football season (Nina got season tickets this year, I opted to invest my share into wine…duh). We had a marvelous trip to South East Asia, and finished it off with 28 hours in my beloved Seoul, where I lived for 5 months many years ago. It was a bag of mixed feelings, being back in that city after so many years, meeting old colleagues and eating true Korean food. Just a wonderful finish for this trip. As I mentioned before, we visited GranMonte Winery in Thailand, and I plan on writing about this estate in the near future.

Today, I want to pause a moment and do a retrospect on my summer guest blogging series. First of all, fellow writers, thank you so much for your contributions! I was blown away by your posts and the generosity with which you supplied them. It was totally heartwarming to site so many thousands of miles away in Thailand, Laos or Cambodia and see the posts come up…thank you.

Second, the series was a great success. It kept the visitor numbers pretty much stable throughout the summer, which is what I had hoped for and was glad to see. Some of the posts broke or came close to old records of mine: One post made the most likes I ever received on a post (Megan, your readers are very like-prone! :), another almost made my daily views record, yet another made it a first with a self-composed song…most importantly, the series kept the conversation going, as was visible through all the commenting on the posts.

Third, I thought the content was really great: The diversity of approaches to my theme “Somewhere, Beyond the Sea” showed what inspirational writers all of you are. I found the content to be enriching, educational and fun. To me, this is what wine writing and blogging in general is about. The most important key aspect for me, though, was to see how the personal sides of all writers shone through. It is the personality aspect, and bringing people together, which I liked most about this endeavor.

In case you missed any of the posts, here they are again, in chronological order. That should make for a long, long Sunday Read. It is good to be back home, and I am looking forward to taking up posting again. Thank you all, writers and readers, for your continued interest in my blog. It is a great place to be in.

The Wine Raconteur: Chateau Latour 1961

Linda Foxworth: Beyond the Sea, Confined by Beauty

The Armchair Sommelier: Drinking Carmenère with the Devil

Talk-a-vino: Liquid Pleasures Beyond Wine – Rum

Tracy Lee Karner: 2011 Forster Kirchenstück Riesling inspires Happiness

Stefano Crosio: Cloudy Bay, Sauvignon Blanc Marlborough 2012

Erica Vitkin: Is Ignorance Bliss?

Kawavino: Trebinje – The Wine Capital of Republika Srpska

Cowboys and Crossbones: If this Wine Glass could talk

Talk-a-vino: Surrounded by the Ocean – Truro Vineyards

The Wine Raconteur: Torbreck “The Factor” 2001

Oenophilogical: Dry Creek Fumé Blanc 2011

Whine and Cheers: A Cuban and a Bottle of Carménère on Prince Edward Island

The Food and Wine Hedonist: While The Winegetter is Beyond the Sea…

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