Tag Archives: dr. hermann

Stellenbosch: First Impressions Part II (more photos)

This is Part II of my first impressions of Stellenbosch. You can find the first part here. We visited Stellenbosch as guests of Stellenbosch Wine Routes.

We left the previous post with our tasting at Stellekaya, from which we headed over to Middelvlei Wine Estate. Middelvlei’s Jeanneret and Ben Momberg waited for us with a special treat: We got to make our own Cape Blend from basic 2013 Pinotage, Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz wines!

Winegetters and Ben Momberg

We had so much fun figuring out what percentages should go into the “Winegetter Selection” (in this one I am adding some sugar).

Blending at Middelvlei

After we’d found our blend, I got to fill it into a bottle and personally cork it. The bottle awaited us, with a personal label and properly capped, at our next hotel.

Corking our Cuvee

After Middelvlei, we had some time left on our hands, so I decided to make use of the gorgeous bathtub in our room at Evergreen Manor and Spa. Abrie, the winemaker at Kanonkop, had given us the open bottle of 1999 Pinotage from the tasting, and it was perfect…

Kanonkop Bathtub

After this short respite, we headed over to Kleine Zalze where the assistant winemaker Dirk led us through a tasting, which once more showed strong Chenin blancs.

Kleine Zalze

Dinner that night was at Terroir, which is the restaurant at Kleine Zalze. The food was stunning visually and how it was executed. This is a lemon bar for dessert.

Dessert at Terroir

This is a random sunset, taken at Kanonkop.

Sunset at Kanonkop

The next morning, we took a tour with Hanli Fourier of Bites and Sites. She offers walking history and food tours, and man were we in for a treat. We got Biltong (the South African version of beef jerky) and Droewors (a dried sausage) at Eikeboom Butchery, the oldest in town (we’re posing with the butcher here).

At the Butcher Shop

After coffee, we headed to ZAR Tea Emporium for a Roibos tea tasting and class with Fazlin Railoun. What great fun and how tasty! We bought a kilo to take home. ‘nuff said.

Rooibos Tasting at ZAR Tea Emporium

Also, apparently I was getting a little sick of all those photo takings…:) The other two look splendid.

ZAR Tea Emporium

From there, we headed to Rustenberg winery with its stunning views set among the hills of Stellenbosch. Murray Barlow took us on a vineyard tour and then shared some of their treasures with us.

Rustenberg Vineyard Tour

Next stop was Delheim Wine Estate, another gorgeously set winery. They pride themselves in accessibility and family-friendliness and their pancake and wine pairing as well as the cupcake and wine pairing was fun, educating and super tasty.

Pancake Pairing at Delheim

Our last night we stayed at Wedgeview Country House and Spa, where they gave us the honeymoon suite just in time to prevent a break up that was a definite priority before kickoff of the US v. Germany game in the World Cup that night. The US lost, but advanced, so no breaking up was necessary. And no, I didn’t wear this sweater for photo purposes.

At Wedgeview

We had dinner at Spier Wine Farm’s restaurant, where we reminisced about the trip and started saying good bye to Stellenbosch in style…

Dinner at Spier

The next morning we did a surprise visit to Ken Forrester Vineyards after my German friend Christian of the Mosel winery Dr. Hermann told me they sold their wines. I just love our worldwide wine friendships…

Wine friends around the world

While there, we were treated to some of the best Chenin blancs I have had, most notably the FMC.

At the Chenin Man Ken Forrester

We also headed back to Kanonkop to take a few bottles of the currently re-released 2004 Pinotage we tried at the tasting. While there, Nina took a photo of me with my new best friend: Paul Sauer in its 18 liter version.

Winegetter and 18 liters of Paul Sauer

We then tried to figure out the logistics of taking wines back to Europe…not an easy task, really. Turns out we had to drink a bunch of them while still here…

Logistics of packing our stash

After that it was time to say good bye as we headed to Cape Town for more adventures. But most of all: rehydration.

The Winegetter in Cape Town

If all of these photos haven’t given you ample reasons to visit Stellenbosch, I seriously don’t know what’s wrong with you…;)

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Some shots from the harvest in Germany

Instead of the usual Sunday read, I want to just show you some photos from the end of the German wine harvest. The harvest is almost over now in Germany. German wineries often go through their vineyards several times during harvest, selecting the grapes for each particular style of wine. The longer the grapes hang, usually the higher the concentration leading up to shrivelled, mostly botrytized grapes that are used for the stars of sweet wines, Beerenauslese and Trockenbeerenauslese.

Nik Weis, the owner and winemaker of St. Urbanshof, a winery in the Saar valley, posted some photos the other day of their final stages of harvest and I asked him whether I could share them. I hope you find them as interesting as I did. It gives you an idea of how labor intensive just the collection of grapes for these very high end wines is, and how low yields are, which explains their high prices…

I have added some photos from the harvest in the prime Mosel vineyard Erdener Prälat, taken by my friend ManSoo, who harvested there with Dr. Hermann winery.

I am leaving for a few weeks in Germany the coming weekend, and I am excited about trying the 2012 vintage of my beloved Mosel and Sarr Rieslings as well as wine from new places for me: I will visit the Kistenmacher-Hengerer estate, a newly minted member of the elite winemaker association VDP, in Württemberg, a region I hardly know anything about, for example.

Happy Sunday!

Another round of harvesting begins in Erdener Prälat

Another round of harvesting begins in Erdener Prälat

Collecting healthy and slightly shrivelled grapes

Collecting healthy and slightly shrivelled grapes in Erdener Prälat

Healthy Riesling Grape Cluster in Ockfener Bockstein

Healthy Riesling Grape Cluster in Ockfener Bockstein

Further selection taking place...

Further selection taking place… (Erdener Prälat)

Once the grapes get crushed, this "must weight scale" shows the density of the must in degrees Oechsle, which determines what quality category a wine can be listed as.

Once the grapes get crushed, this “must weight scale” shows the density of the must in degrees Oechsle, which determines what quality category a wine can be listed as.

Now that is manual labor.

Now that is manual labor: Highly shrivelled grape harvest on the Saar (St. Urbanshof)

Slowly, slowly piling up...

Slowly, slowly piling up…(St. Urbanshof)

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2011 Dr. Hermann H Riesling and 2009 Dr. Hermann Erdener Treppchen Riesling Kabinett

Dr. Hermann wines

Dr. Hermann wines

As I mentioned in my last post,  at Crush wine bistro in Anchorage we had the lucky chance to try two rieslings by one of my favorite wineries in the middle Mosel region: Dr. Hermann. I wrote about the winery extensively here, so please check that out if you are not familiar with them.

The 2011 Dr. Hermann H Riesling is their entry level riesling made with grapes from the region. I have been a huge fan of that entry level wine, I thought the 2010 was stellar. When we tried this vintage in June 2011, it was not as vibrant as the 2010 I remembered but still a good $7 bottle (at the winery). At Crush, the wine presented itself a bit more settled. The nose had floral notes and some aromas that I can only describe as doughy (as in cake batter); actually quite pleasant. On the palate, the light-bodied wine showed honey and candied apricots and some pear with a decent enough acidity. In the finish, I got almonds. I still thought the wine tasted a bit too sweet, but it was enjoyable. I miss the 2010, but I can live with this vintage, too.

Dr. Hermann H Riesling

The 2009 Dr. Hermann Erdener Treppchen Riesling Kabinett presented itself as having aged quite nicely. In the past, Erdener Treppchen has been my preferred vineyard for this winery and this wine did not let me down (see a photo of the vineyard here). In the glass, we had a golden yellow, slightly amber wine. The nose showed some signs of that particular aroma that aged rieslings have (I don’t know how to describe it, a bit musty maybe), with detectable citrus aromas. On the palate, this lean wine had already contracted a bit and showed a beautifully round aroma of citrus, apricot and toffee with a medium finish that let on hints of vanilla. At first I was surprised by these signs of ageing because I had not expected them, but when I realized it was a kabinett and not a spätlese (as I had originally thought) I relaxed. A kabinett can show these signs after 3 years in the bottle. As it opened up further, it showed pineapple and red apples aromas, too. It really was quite beautiful and is right for drinking now.

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